Day 11: Irresistible

The Lord appeared to us in the past, saying: “I have loved you with an everlasting love; I have drawn you with lovingkindness.”( Jeremiah 31:3 )

As the Ranger Students would cross the objective during a cold winter’s raid, they would invariably end up somewhere near the fire. The OPFOR always had a fire on the objective to illuminate (makes it easier for the Rangers to find) and for warmth.  The light and heat were just too much for these frozen Hooahs to resist. The fire was so irresistible they would violate the tactical principle of dispersion. It happened without fail. Life is the same. It’s cold out there and it can be bitter to the bone. But the light and warmth of God’s love are irresistible without any bad consequences. Come in out of the cold.

Application: Share the love of God with one person this week. Invite them to church, Bible study, or a fellowship activity. Tell them what Jesus has done in your life. Or share a passage of encouraging scripture.

Ranger Students – Ranger School is one of the toughest training courses for which a Soldier can volunteer. Army Rangers are experts in leading Soldiers on difficult missions – and to do this, they need rigorous training. For more than two months, Ranger students train to exhaustion, pushing the limits of their minds and bodies.

www.wikipedia.org 

Raid – Raiding, also known as depredation, is a military tactic or operational warfare mission which has a specific purpose and is not normally intended to capture and hold a location but instead finish with the raiding force quickly retreating to a previous defended position prior to enemy forces being able to respond in a coordinated manner or formulate a counter-attack. A raiding group may consist of combatants specially trained in this tactic, such as commandos, or as a special mission assigned to any general troops. Raids are often a standard tactic in irregular warfare, employed by warriorsguerrilla fighters or other irregular military forces. Some raids are large, for example the Sullivan Expedition.

Hooah /ˈhɑː/ is a battle cry used by soldiers in the U.S. Army and airmen in the U.S. Air Force.[1] Originally spelled “Hough“, the battle cry was first used by members of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (United States) during the Second Seminole War in 1841, after Seminole chief Coacoochee toasted officers of the regiment with a loud “Hough!”, apparently a corruption of “How d’ye do!”[2] Since WWII, the word has been widely used throughout the US Army and gained a more general meaning of “anything and everything except ‘no'”.[3][4] It is comparable to Oorah (Marines) in the United States Marine Corps, and Hooyah in the United States Navy.

Author: Chuck & Deb

Chuck & Deb love Jesus!

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